20 September 2018

Update on the expert groups ahead of the preliminary hearings

Using expert groups means that everyone will be able to see what expert input is given to the Chair.

To help get to the truth of what has happened in the most authoritative and transparent way possible, the Chair is appointing expert groups to advise him openly. These will cover the relevant fields: not only the clinical specialisms such as haematology, transfusion medicine, hepatology and virology but also medical ethics, public health and administration, psychosocial impact, and statistics.

Using expert groups means that everyone will be able to see what expert input is given to the Chair. The reports of the groups will, as evidence, be fully open, accessible and transparent. Where there are significant disagreements among the experts, these will be tested, explored and challenged openly in the public hearings.

The Chair welcomes suggestions, in particular from core participants, as to whether there are further experts he should invite to join the groups. Similarly he welcomes any offers of assistance from individuals who have recognised expertise to offer. The criteria for appointment to the groups are set out in the Statement of Approach: Expert Groups. Each expert will be expected to give their independent unvarnished views to help the Inquiry resolve the issues it is investigating.

Formal appointments will be made after the preliminary hearings. Core participants will have the opportunity at the preliminary hearings (and throughout the Inquiry) to propose additional experts for consideration by the Chair. The experts who have so far agreed to join the expert groups are listed in the attached document.

Update on the expert groups ahead of the preliminary hearings

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